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4 smoothies to get you in shape for summer

4 smoothies to get you in shape for summer



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There’s nothing I love more than a delicious and fruity smoothie on a hot summer day. I enjoy experimenting with different ingredients to make healthy options that I won’t feel guilty about indulging in. Here are some of my favorites:

Prep Time: 2 minutes
Cook Time: 3 minutes
Total Time: 5 minutes

Servings: 1

Blueberry & Agave

Photo by Rachel Piorko

Ingredients:
2 cups organic frozen blueberries
1 cup of orange juice
1 ½ teaspoon chia seeds
1 ½ teaspoon agave
½ cup of ice

Directions:
1.Mix all of the ingredients above and blend until smooth.

Green Tea & Berry

Photo by Rachel Piorko

Ingredients:
½ cup frozen organic blueberries
½ cup frozen organic strawberries
½ cup chilled green tea
¾ cup plain low-fat Greek yogurt (I like Chobani)
2 tablespoons of chia seeds

Directions:
1. Mix all of the ingredients together and blend until smooth.

Super Green Coconut Detox Smoothie

Photo by Rachel Piorko

Ingredients:
2 cups of spinach
1 cup coconut milk
½ cup orange juice
1 large banana
½ cup pineapple
1 tablespoon of honey
1 cup of ice
1 tablespoon shaved coconut

Directions:
1. Mix spinach, coconut milk, orange juice, banana, pineapple, honey and ice together and blend until smooth. When finished, sprinkle over with shaved coconut.

Tip: Sometimes I like to add kiwi for an extra fruity flavor. If you don’t have fresh pineapple, feel free to substitute with strawberries or blueberries.

Raspberry – Oatmeal

Photo by Rachel Piorko

Ingredients:
1 cup ice
1/2 cup frozen raspberries
1/2 cup plain low-fat yogurt
1 banana
1/2 cup old-fashioned rolled oats (not instant)
1 tablespoon honey
1 cup of water (or coconut water)

Directions:
1. Mix all of the ingredients above and blend until smooth. Enjoy!

View the original post, 4 smoothies to get you in shape for summer, on Spoon University.

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31 Healthy Smoothie Recipes That Are Fast and Filling

Craving a glass of cool, creamy, and nutritious goodness? Time to get out the blender and some healthy smoothie recipes.

Smoothies are a tasty and convenient way to whip up a nourishing snack, sweet treat, or even a legit meal. “Smoothies are a nice, easily digestible way to get some good nutrition in you if you don’t have much of an appetite when you wake up, which is something a lot of people struggle with,” Rachael Hartley, R.D., certified intuitive eating counselor and owner of Rachael Hartley Nutrition, tells SELF. They’re also a pretty handy option for the many of us experiencing cooking burnout right now.

While just the basics (fruit and a liquid) should do it for a light snack or dessert, a smoothie meant to be a bigger snack or meal calls for a few more ingredients if it’s going to be truly satisfying, Hartley says. Fruit is rich in naturally occurring sugar and fiber, but you’ll want to add some protein and fat to your carbs for a more balanced and filling meal, Hartley says. Dairy or soy milk and Greek yogurt are great sources of protein (and fat, if you go full-fat), Hartley says, while nut butter adds creaminess and fat, plus a smidge of protein and fiber. A couple of other examples of great add-ins are avocado (for creaminess, fat, and fiber) and oats (for fiber and texture).

Now, of course, if you’re a green-smoothie person—hello there!—then feel free to throw in a handful of leafy greens for an extra serving of veggies. (I find baby spinach to be the best bet since it’s mild and tender, so it blends well.) But if you’re not into greens in your smoothie, that’s fine too. There’s literally no need to add anything to your smoothie if you don’t like the taste. “You want to enjoy it, not be choking it down!” Hartley says. (Speaking of which: Don’t forget about flavorings like vanilla or cocoa powder and a sweetener.)

We rounded up a bunch of creative, delectable, nutrition-packed smoothie recipes. Smoothies are “pretty adaptable,” Hartley says, so feel free to add or swap ingredients, or adjust the liquid ratio to your liking. Here are 31 healthy smoothie recipes so you can get blending.

A note about the word healthy here: We know that healthy is a complicated concept. Not only can it mean different things to different people, it’s a word that’s pretty loaded (and sometimes fraught), thanks to the diet industry’s influence on the way we think about food. At SELF, when we talk about food being healthy, we’re primarily talking about foods that are nutritious, filling, and satisfying. But it also depends on your preferences, your culture, what’s accessible to you, and so much more. We selected these recipes with those basic criteria in mind, while also trying to appeal to a wide variety of nutritional needs and taste buds.


31 Healthy Smoothie Recipes That Are Fast and Filling

Craving a glass of cool, creamy, and nutritious goodness? Time to get out the blender and some healthy smoothie recipes.

Smoothies are a tasty and convenient way to whip up a nourishing snack, sweet treat, or even a legit meal. “Smoothies are a nice, easily digestible way to get some good nutrition in you if you don’t have much of an appetite when you wake up, which is something a lot of people struggle with,” Rachael Hartley, R.D., certified intuitive eating counselor and owner of Rachael Hartley Nutrition, tells SELF. They’re also a pretty handy option for the many of us experiencing cooking burnout right now.

While just the basics (fruit and a liquid) should do it for a light snack or dessert, a smoothie meant to be a bigger snack or meal calls for a few more ingredients if it’s going to be truly satisfying, Hartley says. Fruit is rich in naturally occurring sugar and fiber, but you’ll want to add some protein and fat to your carbs for a more balanced and filling meal, Hartley says. Dairy or soy milk and Greek yogurt are great sources of protein (and fat, if you go full-fat), Hartley says, while nut butter adds creaminess and fat, plus a smidge of protein and fiber. A couple of other examples of great add-ins are avocado (for creaminess, fat, and fiber) and oats (for fiber and texture).

Now, of course, if you’re a green-smoothie person—hello there!—then feel free to throw in a handful of leafy greens for an extra serving of veggies. (I find baby spinach to be the best bet since it’s mild and tender, so it blends well.) But if you’re not into greens in your smoothie, that’s fine too. There’s literally no need to add anything to your smoothie if you don’t like the taste. “You want to enjoy it, not be choking it down!” Hartley says. (Speaking of which: Don’t forget about flavorings like vanilla or cocoa powder and a sweetener.)

We rounded up a bunch of creative, delectable, nutrition-packed smoothie recipes. Smoothies are “pretty adaptable,” Hartley says, so feel free to add or swap ingredients, or adjust the liquid ratio to your liking. Here are 31 healthy smoothie recipes so you can get blending.

A note about the word healthy here: We know that healthy is a complicated concept. Not only can it mean different things to different people, it’s a word that’s pretty loaded (and sometimes fraught), thanks to the diet industry’s influence on the way we think about food. At SELF, when we talk about food being healthy, we’re primarily talking about foods that are nutritious, filling, and satisfying. But it also depends on your preferences, your culture, what’s accessible to you, and so much more. We selected these recipes with those basic criteria in mind, while also trying to appeal to a wide variety of nutritional needs and taste buds.


31 Healthy Smoothie Recipes That Are Fast and Filling

Craving a glass of cool, creamy, and nutritious goodness? Time to get out the blender and some healthy smoothie recipes.

Smoothies are a tasty and convenient way to whip up a nourishing snack, sweet treat, or even a legit meal. “Smoothies are a nice, easily digestible way to get some good nutrition in you if you don’t have much of an appetite when you wake up, which is something a lot of people struggle with,” Rachael Hartley, R.D., certified intuitive eating counselor and owner of Rachael Hartley Nutrition, tells SELF. They’re also a pretty handy option for the many of us experiencing cooking burnout right now.

While just the basics (fruit and a liquid) should do it for a light snack or dessert, a smoothie meant to be a bigger snack or meal calls for a few more ingredients if it’s going to be truly satisfying, Hartley says. Fruit is rich in naturally occurring sugar and fiber, but you’ll want to add some protein and fat to your carbs for a more balanced and filling meal, Hartley says. Dairy or soy milk and Greek yogurt are great sources of protein (and fat, if you go full-fat), Hartley says, while nut butter adds creaminess and fat, plus a smidge of protein and fiber. A couple of other examples of great add-ins are avocado (for creaminess, fat, and fiber) and oats (for fiber and texture).

Now, of course, if you’re a green-smoothie person—hello there!—then feel free to throw in a handful of leafy greens for an extra serving of veggies. (I find baby spinach to be the best bet since it’s mild and tender, so it blends well.) But if you’re not into greens in your smoothie, that’s fine too. There’s literally no need to add anything to your smoothie if you don’t like the taste. “You want to enjoy it, not be choking it down!” Hartley says. (Speaking of which: Don’t forget about flavorings like vanilla or cocoa powder and a sweetener.)

We rounded up a bunch of creative, delectable, nutrition-packed smoothie recipes. Smoothies are “pretty adaptable,” Hartley says, so feel free to add or swap ingredients, or adjust the liquid ratio to your liking. Here are 31 healthy smoothie recipes so you can get blending.

A note about the word healthy here: We know that healthy is a complicated concept. Not only can it mean different things to different people, it’s a word that’s pretty loaded (and sometimes fraught), thanks to the diet industry’s influence on the way we think about food. At SELF, when we talk about food being healthy, we’re primarily talking about foods that are nutritious, filling, and satisfying. But it also depends on your preferences, your culture, what’s accessible to you, and so much more. We selected these recipes with those basic criteria in mind, while also trying to appeal to a wide variety of nutritional needs and taste buds.


31 Healthy Smoothie Recipes That Are Fast and Filling

Craving a glass of cool, creamy, and nutritious goodness? Time to get out the blender and some healthy smoothie recipes.

Smoothies are a tasty and convenient way to whip up a nourishing snack, sweet treat, or even a legit meal. “Smoothies are a nice, easily digestible way to get some good nutrition in you if you don’t have much of an appetite when you wake up, which is something a lot of people struggle with,” Rachael Hartley, R.D., certified intuitive eating counselor and owner of Rachael Hartley Nutrition, tells SELF. They’re also a pretty handy option for the many of us experiencing cooking burnout right now.

While just the basics (fruit and a liquid) should do it for a light snack or dessert, a smoothie meant to be a bigger snack or meal calls for a few more ingredients if it’s going to be truly satisfying, Hartley says. Fruit is rich in naturally occurring sugar and fiber, but you’ll want to add some protein and fat to your carbs for a more balanced and filling meal, Hartley says. Dairy or soy milk and Greek yogurt are great sources of protein (and fat, if you go full-fat), Hartley says, while nut butter adds creaminess and fat, plus a smidge of protein and fiber. A couple of other examples of great add-ins are avocado (for creaminess, fat, and fiber) and oats (for fiber and texture).

Now, of course, if you’re a green-smoothie person—hello there!—then feel free to throw in a handful of leafy greens for an extra serving of veggies. (I find baby spinach to be the best bet since it’s mild and tender, so it blends well.) But if you’re not into greens in your smoothie, that’s fine too. There’s literally no need to add anything to your smoothie if you don’t like the taste. “You want to enjoy it, not be choking it down!” Hartley says. (Speaking of which: Don’t forget about flavorings like vanilla or cocoa powder and a sweetener.)

We rounded up a bunch of creative, delectable, nutrition-packed smoothie recipes. Smoothies are “pretty adaptable,” Hartley says, so feel free to add or swap ingredients, or adjust the liquid ratio to your liking. Here are 31 healthy smoothie recipes so you can get blending.

A note about the word healthy here: We know that healthy is a complicated concept. Not only can it mean different things to different people, it’s a word that’s pretty loaded (and sometimes fraught), thanks to the diet industry’s influence on the way we think about food. At SELF, when we talk about food being healthy, we’re primarily talking about foods that are nutritious, filling, and satisfying. But it also depends on your preferences, your culture, what’s accessible to you, and so much more. We selected these recipes with those basic criteria in mind, while also trying to appeal to a wide variety of nutritional needs and taste buds.


31 Healthy Smoothie Recipes That Are Fast and Filling

Craving a glass of cool, creamy, and nutritious goodness? Time to get out the blender and some healthy smoothie recipes.

Smoothies are a tasty and convenient way to whip up a nourishing snack, sweet treat, or even a legit meal. “Smoothies are a nice, easily digestible way to get some good nutrition in you if you don’t have much of an appetite when you wake up, which is something a lot of people struggle with,” Rachael Hartley, R.D., certified intuitive eating counselor and owner of Rachael Hartley Nutrition, tells SELF. They’re also a pretty handy option for the many of us experiencing cooking burnout right now.

While just the basics (fruit and a liquid) should do it for a light snack or dessert, a smoothie meant to be a bigger snack or meal calls for a few more ingredients if it’s going to be truly satisfying, Hartley says. Fruit is rich in naturally occurring sugar and fiber, but you’ll want to add some protein and fat to your carbs for a more balanced and filling meal, Hartley says. Dairy or soy milk and Greek yogurt are great sources of protein (and fat, if you go full-fat), Hartley says, while nut butter adds creaminess and fat, plus a smidge of protein and fiber. A couple of other examples of great add-ins are avocado (for creaminess, fat, and fiber) and oats (for fiber and texture).

Now, of course, if you’re a green-smoothie person—hello there!—then feel free to throw in a handful of leafy greens for an extra serving of veggies. (I find baby spinach to be the best bet since it’s mild and tender, so it blends well.) But if you’re not into greens in your smoothie, that’s fine too. There’s literally no need to add anything to your smoothie if you don’t like the taste. “You want to enjoy it, not be choking it down!” Hartley says. (Speaking of which: Don’t forget about flavorings like vanilla or cocoa powder and a sweetener.)

We rounded up a bunch of creative, delectable, nutrition-packed smoothie recipes. Smoothies are “pretty adaptable,” Hartley says, so feel free to add or swap ingredients, or adjust the liquid ratio to your liking. Here are 31 healthy smoothie recipes so you can get blending.

A note about the word healthy here: We know that healthy is a complicated concept. Not only can it mean different things to different people, it’s a word that’s pretty loaded (and sometimes fraught), thanks to the diet industry’s influence on the way we think about food. At SELF, when we talk about food being healthy, we’re primarily talking about foods that are nutritious, filling, and satisfying. But it also depends on your preferences, your culture, what’s accessible to you, and so much more. We selected these recipes with those basic criteria in mind, while also trying to appeal to a wide variety of nutritional needs and taste buds.


31 Healthy Smoothie Recipes That Are Fast and Filling

Craving a glass of cool, creamy, and nutritious goodness? Time to get out the blender and some healthy smoothie recipes.

Smoothies are a tasty and convenient way to whip up a nourishing snack, sweet treat, or even a legit meal. “Smoothies are a nice, easily digestible way to get some good nutrition in you if you don’t have much of an appetite when you wake up, which is something a lot of people struggle with,” Rachael Hartley, R.D., certified intuitive eating counselor and owner of Rachael Hartley Nutrition, tells SELF. They’re also a pretty handy option for the many of us experiencing cooking burnout right now.

While just the basics (fruit and a liquid) should do it for a light snack or dessert, a smoothie meant to be a bigger snack or meal calls for a few more ingredients if it’s going to be truly satisfying, Hartley says. Fruit is rich in naturally occurring sugar and fiber, but you’ll want to add some protein and fat to your carbs for a more balanced and filling meal, Hartley says. Dairy or soy milk and Greek yogurt are great sources of protein (and fat, if you go full-fat), Hartley says, while nut butter adds creaminess and fat, plus a smidge of protein and fiber. A couple of other examples of great add-ins are avocado (for creaminess, fat, and fiber) and oats (for fiber and texture).

Now, of course, if you’re a green-smoothie person—hello there!—then feel free to throw in a handful of leafy greens for an extra serving of veggies. (I find baby spinach to be the best bet since it’s mild and tender, so it blends well.) But if you’re not into greens in your smoothie, that’s fine too. There’s literally no need to add anything to your smoothie if you don’t like the taste. “You want to enjoy it, not be choking it down!” Hartley says. (Speaking of which: Don’t forget about flavorings like vanilla or cocoa powder and a sweetener.)

We rounded up a bunch of creative, delectable, nutrition-packed smoothie recipes. Smoothies are “pretty adaptable,” Hartley says, so feel free to add or swap ingredients, or adjust the liquid ratio to your liking. Here are 31 healthy smoothie recipes so you can get blending.

A note about the word healthy here: We know that healthy is a complicated concept. Not only can it mean different things to different people, it’s a word that’s pretty loaded (and sometimes fraught), thanks to the diet industry’s influence on the way we think about food. At SELF, when we talk about food being healthy, we’re primarily talking about foods that are nutritious, filling, and satisfying. But it also depends on your preferences, your culture, what’s accessible to you, and so much more. We selected these recipes with those basic criteria in mind, while also trying to appeal to a wide variety of nutritional needs and taste buds.


31 Healthy Smoothie Recipes That Are Fast and Filling

Craving a glass of cool, creamy, and nutritious goodness? Time to get out the blender and some healthy smoothie recipes.

Smoothies are a tasty and convenient way to whip up a nourishing snack, sweet treat, or even a legit meal. “Smoothies are a nice, easily digestible way to get some good nutrition in you if you don’t have much of an appetite when you wake up, which is something a lot of people struggle with,” Rachael Hartley, R.D., certified intuitive eating counselor and owner of Rachael Hartley Nutrition, tells SELF. They’re also a pretty handy option for the many of us experiencing cooking burnout right now.

While just the basics (fruit and a liquid) should do it for a light snack or dessert, a smoothie meant to be a bigger snack or meal calls for a few more ingredients if it’s going to be truly satisfying, Hartley says. Fruit is rich in naturally occurring sugar and fiber, but you’ll want to add some protein and fat to your carbs for a more balanced and filling meal, Hartley says. Dairy or soy milk and Greek yogurt are great sources of protein (and fat, if you go full-fat), Hartley says, while nut butter adds creaminess and fat, plus a smidge of protein and fiber. A couple of other examples of great add-ins are avocado (for creaminess, fat, and fiber) and oats (for fiber and texture).

Now, of course, if you’re a green-smoothie person—hello there!—then feel free to throw in a handful of leafy greens for an extra serving of veggies. (I find baby spinach to be the best bet since it’s mild and tender, so it blends well.) But if you’re not into greens in your smoothie, that’s fine too. There’s literally no need to add anything to your smoothie if you don’t like the taste. “You want to enjoy it, not be choking it down!” Hartley says. (Speaking of which: Don’t forget about flavorings like vanilla or cocoa powder and a sweetener.)

We rounded up a bunch of creative, delectable, nutrition-packed smoothie recipes. Smoothies are “pretty adaptable,” Hartley says, so feel free to add or swap ingredients, or adjust the liquid ratio to your liking. Here are 31 healthy smoothie recipes so you can get blending.

A note about the word healthy here: We know that healthy is a complicated concept. Not only can it mean different things to different people, it’s a word that’s pretty loaded (and sometimes fraught), thanks to the diet industry’s influence on the way we think about food. At SELF, when we talk about food being healthy, we’re primarily talking about foods that are nutritious, filling, and satisfying. But it also depends on your preferences, your culture, what’s accessible to you, and so much more. We selected these recipes with those basic criteria in mind, while also trying to appeal to a wide variety of nutritional needs and taste buds.


31 Healthy Smoothie Recipes That Are Fast and Filling

Craving a glass of cool, creamy, and nutritious goodness? Time to get out the blender and some healthy smoothie recipes.

Smoothies are a tasty and convenient way to whip up a nourishing snack, sweet treat, or even a legit meal. “Smoothies are a nice, easily digestible way to get some good nutrition in you if you don’t have much of an appetite when you wake up, which is something a lot of people struggle with,” Rachael Hartley, R.D., certified intuitive eating counselor and owner of Rachael Hartley Nutrition, tells SELF. They’re also a pretty handy option for the many of us experiencing cooking burnout right now.

While just the basics (fruit and a liquid) should do it for a light snack or dessert, a smoothie meant to be a bigger snack or meal calls for a few more ingredients if it’s going to be truly satisfying, Hartley says. Fruit is rich in naturally occurring sugar and fiber, but you’ll want to add some protein and fat to your carbs for a more balanced and filling meal, Hartley says. Dairy or soy milk and Greek yogurt are great sources of protein (and fat, if you go full-fat), Hartley says, while nut butter adds creaminess and fat, plus a smidge of protein and fiber. A couple of other examples of great add-ins are avocado (for creaminess, fat, and fiber) and oats (for fiber and texture).

Now, of course, if you’re a green-smoothie person—hello there!—then feel free to throw in a handful of leafy greens for an extra serving of veggies. (I find baby spinach to be the best bet since it’s mild and tender, so it blends well.) But if you’re not into greens in your smoothie, that’s fine too. There’s literally no need to add anything to your smoothie if you don’t like the taste. “You want to enjoy it, not be choking it down!” Hartley says. (Speaking of which: Don’t forget about flavorings like vanilla or cocoa powder and a sweetener.)

We rounded up a bunch of creative, delectable, nutrition-packed smoothie recipes. Smoothies are “pretty adaptable,” Hartley says, so feel free to add or swap ingredients, or adjust the liquid ratio to your liking. Here are 31 healthy smoothie recipes so you can get blending.

A note about the word healthy here: We know that healthy is a complicated concept. Not only can it mean different things to different people, it’s a word that’s pretty loaded (and sometimes fraught), thanks to the diet industry’s influence on the way we think about food. At SELF, when we talk about food being healthy, we’re primarily talking about foods that are nutritious, filling, and satisfying. But it also depends on your preferences, your culture, what’s accessible to you, and so much more. We selected these recipes with those basic criteria in mind, while also trying to appeal to a wide variety of nutritional needs and taste buds.


31 Healthy Smoothie Recipes That Are Fast and Filling

Craving a glass of cool, creamy, and nutritious goodness? Time to get out the blender and some healthy smoothie recipes.

Smoothies are a tasty and convenient way to whip up a nourishing snack, sweet treat, or even a legit meal. “Smoothies are a nice, easily digestible way to get some good nutrition in you if you don’t have much of an appetite when you wake up, which is something a lot of people struggle with,” Rachael Hartley, R.D., certified intuitive eating counselor and owner of Rachael Hartley Nutrition, tells SELF. They’re also a pretty handy option for the many of us experiencing cooking burnout right now.

While just the basics (fruit and a liquid) should do it for a light snack or dessert, a smoothie meant to be a bigger snack or meal calls for a few more ingredients if it’s going to be truly satisfying, Hartley says. Fruit is rich in naturally occurring sugar and fiber, but you’ll want to add some protein and fat to your carbs for a more balanced and filling meal, Hartley says. Dairy or soy milk and Greek yogurt are great sources of protein (and fat, if you go full-fat), Hartley says, while nut butter adds creaminess and fat, plus a smidge of protein and fiber. A couple of other examples of great add-ins are avocado (for creaminess, fat, and fiber) and oats (for fiber and texture).

Now, of course, if you’re a green-smoothie person—hello there!—then feel free to throw in a handful of leafy greens for an extra serving of veggies. (I find baby spinach to be the best bet since it’s mild and tender, so it blends well.) But if you’re not into greens in your smoothie, that’s fine too. There’s literally no need to add anything to your smoothie if you don’t like the taste. “You want to enjoy it, not be choking it down!” Hartley says. (Speaking of which: Don’t forget about flavorings like vanilla or cocoa powder and a sweetener.)

We rounded up a bunch of creative, delectable, nutrition-packed smoothie recipes. Smoothies are “pretty adaptable,” Hartley says, so feel free to add or swap ingredients, or adjust the liquid ratio to your liking. Here are 31 healthy smoothie recipes so you can get blending.

A note about the word healthy here: We know that healthy is a complicated concept. Not only can it mean different things to different people, it’s a word that’s pretty loaded (and sometimes fraught), thanks to the diet industry’s influence on the way we think about food. At SELF, when we talk about food being healthy, we’re primarily talking about foods that are nutritious, filling, and satisfying. But it also depends on your preferences, your culture, what’s accessible to you, and so much more. We selected these recipes with those basic criteria in mind, while also trying to appeal to a wide variety of nutritional needs and taste buds.


31 Healthy Smoothie Recipes That Are Fast and Filling

Craving a glass of cool, creamy, and nutritious goodness? Time to get out the blender and some healthy smoothie recipes.

Smoothies are a tasty and convenient way to whip up a nourishing snack, sweet treat, or even a legit meal. “Smoothies are a nice, easily digestible way to get some good nutrition in you if you don’t have much of an appetite when you wake up, which is something a lot of people struggle with,” Rachael Hartley, R.D., certified intuitive eating counselor and owner of Rachael Hartley Nutrition, tells SELF. They’re also a pretty handy option for the many of us experiencing cooking burnout right now.

While just the basics (fruit and a liquid) should do it for a light snack or dessert, a smoothie meant to be a bigger snack or meal calls for a few more ingredients if it’s going to be truly satisfying, Hartley says. Fruit is rich in naturally occurring sugar and fiber, but you’ll want to add some protein and fat to your carbs for a more balanced and filling meal, Hartley says. Dairy or soy milk and Greek yogurt are great sources of protein (and fat, if you go full-fat), Hartley says, while nut butter adds creaminess and fat, plus a smidge of protein and fiber. A couple of other examples of great add-ins are avocado (for creaminess, fat, and fiber) and oats (for fiber and texture).

Now, of course, if you’re a green-smoothie person—hello there!—then feel free to throw in a handful of leafy greens for an extra serving of veggies. (I find baby spinach to be the best bet since it’s mild and tender, so it blends well.) But if you’re not into greens in your smoothie, that’s fine too. There’s literally no need to add anything to your smoothie if you don’t like the taste. “You want to enjoy it, not be choking it down!” Hartley says. (Speaking of which: Don’t forget about flavorings like vanilla or cocoa powder and a sweetener.)

We rounded up a bunch of creative, delectable, nutrition-packed smoothie recipes. Smoothies are “pretty adaptable,” Hartley says, so feel free to add or swap ingredients, or adjust the liquid ratio to your liking. Here are 31 healthy smoothie recipes so you can get blending.

A note about the word healthy here: We know that healthy is a complicated concept. Not only can it mean different things to different people, it’s a word that’s pretty loaded (and sometimes fraught), thanks to the diet industry’s influence on the way we think about food. At SELF, when we talk about food being healthy, we’re primarily talking about foods that are nutritious, filling, and satisfying. But it also depends on your preferences, your culture, what’s accessible to you, and so much more. We selected these recipes with those basic criteria in mind, while also trying to appeal to a wide variety of nutritional needs and taste buds.