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You Can’t Always Get What You Want

You Can’t Always Get What You Want


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A recent poll reveals Americans prefer organic, but cannot afford the high prices

Each month Thomas Reuters and NPR team up to poll approximately 3,000 Americans regarding various health topics and issues. The poll that was released this June showed that the majority of Americans prefer eating organic foods. Demographics reveal that out of the 58% of consumers who reported favoring organically-grown produce, the majority of them are young, educated adults.

As to the question of why, the poll found that among those consumers who said that they prefer eating organic, their main reason was wanting to support local farmers (followed closely by wanting to avoid toxins). While it's great to hear people are becoming increasingly more concerned and aware of what they are eating, don’t go expecting a revolution in the agriculture industry anytime soon. Even though Americans may like organic food better, many of them still end up buying conventionally grown produce. Why? Because it’s cheaper.

The very same poll also discovered that among those Americans who take the conventional route over the organic one, their primary reason for doing so was not being able to afford the high price tag on most organic products. Accessibility was a close second on the list of reasons why Americans end up going with conventionally produced products.

While there is really no way of getting around the bit of extra effort it might take to track down organic produce, environmentalist blogs such as TreeHugger have been responding to the poll results reminding us that there are, in fact, ways to avoid steep costs. State-wide CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) programs and local food co-ops sell organic products at a cheaper price to their members, in exchange for their support and monthly contributions. Also, eating according to what’s in season can save you quite a bit the next time you head to the grocery store.

The Daily Byte is a regular column dedicated to covering interesting food news and trends across the country. Click here for previous columns.


Can’t always get what you want? Don’t worry

T he first time I went on a silent meditation retreat, a few years back, I was terrified the experience might prove impossible to endure. The last time I went, the other week, I faced a different problem: I was pretty sure it would be deeply enjoyable and refreshing. You might be wondering why that counts as a problem. Here’s why. It was on the evening of Day One, watching the sun sink below the horizon, savouring the stillness in the air, that a thought first occurred: “Damn it, only a few more days of this, and it’ll be time to leave!” According to a cheesy old saying, there are two ways to be unhappy. One is not getting what you want. The other is getting it. The trouble with happiness is that the prospect of it ending makes you sad.

I was in a good location to be entertaining such thoughts, since this insight is most commonly attributed to Buddhism, and meditation can help. But the same point crops up in multiple traditions: there’s more to “wanting” than meets the eye. You think the solution to wanting something is to obtain that thing, whereupon you’ll feel satisfied. But it rarely works out that way. Either the thing fails to live up to your expectations, or alternatively it does and then you’re desperate not to lose it. Worse, what you’re really sometimes craving isn’t the thing itself, but novelty – and by definition, you can’t keep obtaining that from the same person or possession. In a recent essay, Getting What We Want Isn’t What We Really Want, the blogger David Cain recalled the bittersweet experience of buying new CDs as a teenager: “Every glorious listen came with a faint streak of dread, because I knew I was only sucking the magic out of it with each play.”

Clearly, the problem here isn’t really with the specific things you want but don’t yet have. Rather, it’s something to do with the phenomenon of wanting itself. Recent work by the neuroscientists Jaak Panksepp and Robert Sapolsky suggests that the brain’s reward mechanisms are designed to give us squirts of dopamine not when we get what we want, but when we pursue it. We’re chemically rewarded for maintaining a state of unfulfilment. From an evolutionary angle, this isn’t a shock: constant restlessness is a better recipe for propagating your genes than contentment. And consumerism exacerbates the situation: the biggest profits come not from fully satisfying your customers, but from making sure they never stop seeking.

According to some hardcore Buddhists, the answer is to transcend desires entirely. A more immediately practical option is simply to keep in mind that wants can be misleading. It always seems as if it’s the next delicious meal, career choice or relationship that will finally deliver, as Cain puts it, “the experience of ease and unfettered enjoyment” they falsely promise. In fact, there’s far more ease to be had “by understanding our wants, rather than scrambling to relieve them”. What you really want is to get proficient at questioning your wants.


Can’t always get what you want? Don’t worry

T he first time I went on a silent meditation retreat, a few years back, I was terrified the experience might prove impossible to endure. The last time I went, the other week, I faced a different problem: I was pretty sure it would be deeply enjoyable and refreshing. You might be wondering why that counts as a problem. Here’s why. It was on the evening of Day One, watching the sun sink below the horizon, savouring the stillness in the air, that a thought first occurred: “Damn it, only a few more days of this, and it’ll be time to leave!” According to a cheesy old saying, there are two ways to be unhappy. One is not getting what you want. The other is getting it. The trouble with happiness is that the prospect of it ending makes you sad.

I was in a good location to be entertaining such thoughts, since this insight is most commonly attributed to Buddhism, and meditation can help. But the same point crops up in multiple traditions: there’s more to “wanting” than meets the eye. You think the solution to wanting something is to obtain that thing, whereupon you’ll feel satisfied. But it rarely works out that way. Either the thing fails to live up to your expectations, or alternatively it does and then you’re desperate not to lose it. Worse, what you’re really sometimes craving isn’t the thing itself, but novelty – and by definition, you can’t keep obtaining that from the same person or possession. In a recent essay, Getting What We Want Isn’t What We Really Want, the blogger David Cain recalled the bittersweet experience of buying new CDs as a teenager: “Every glorious listen came with a faint streak of dread, because I knew I was only sucking the magic out of it with each play.”

Clearly, the problem here isn’t really with the specific things you want but don’t yet have. Rather, it’s something to do with the phenomenon of wanting itself. Recent work by the neuroscientists Jaak Panksepp and Robert Sapolsky suggests that the brain’s reward mechanisms are designed to give us squirts of dopamine not when we get what we want, but when we pursue it. We’re chemically rewarded for maintaining a state of unfulfilment. From an evolutionary angle, this isn’t a shock: constant restlessness is a better recipe for propagating your genes than contentment. And consumerism exacerbates the situation: the biggest profits come not from fully satisfying your customers, but from making sure they never stop seeking.

According to some hardcore Buddhists, the answer is to transcend desires entirely. A more immediately practical option is simply to keep in mind that wants can be misleading. It always seems as if it’s the next delicious meal, career choice or relationship that will finally deliver, as Cain puts it, “the experience of ease and unfettered enjoyment” they falsely promise. In fact, there’s far more ease to be had “by understanding our wants, rather than scrambling to relieve them”. What you really want is to get proficient at questioning your wants.


Can’t always get what you want? Don’t worry

T he first time I went on a silent meditation retreat, a few years back, I was terrified the experience might prove impossible to endure. The last time I went, the other week, I faced a different problem: I was pretty sure it would be deeply enjoyable and refreshing. You might be wondering why that counts as a problem. Here’s why. It was on the evening of Day One, watching the sun sink below the horizon, savouring the stillness in the air, that a thought first occurred: “Damn it, only a few more days of this, and it’ll be time to leave!” According to a cheesy old saying, there are two ways to be unhappy. One is not getting what you want. The other is getting it. The trouble with happiness is that the prospect of it ending makes you sad.

I was in a good location to be entertaining such thoughts, since this insight is most commonly attributed to Buddhism, and meditation can help. But the same point crops up in multiple traditions: there’s more to “wanting” than meets the eye. You think the solution to wanting something is to obtain that thing, whereupon you’ll feel satisfied. But it rarely works out that way. Either the thing fails to live up to your expectations, or alternatively it does and then you’re desperate not to lose it. Worse, what you’re really sometimes craving isn’t the thing itself, but novelty – and by definition, you can’t keep obtaining that from the same person or possession. In a recent essay, Getting What We Want Isn’t What We Really Want, the blogger David Cain recalled the bittersweet experience of buying new CDs as a teenager: “Every glorious listen came with a faint streak of dread, because I knew I was only sucking the magic out of it with each play.”

Clearly, the problem here isn’t really with the specific things you want but don’t yet have. Rather, it’s something to do with the phenomenon of wanting itself. Recent work by the neuroscientists Jaak Panksepp and Robert Sapolsky suggests that the brain’s reward mechanisms are designed to give us squirts of dopamine not when we get what we want, but when we pursue it. We’re chemically rewarded for maintaining a state of unfulfilment. From an evolutionary angle, this isn’t a shock: constant restlessness is a better recipe for propagating your genes than contentment. And consumerism exacerbates the situation: the biggest profits come not from fully satisfying your customers, but from making sure they never stop seeking.

According to some hardcore Buddhists, the answer is to transcend desires entirely. A more immediately practical option is simply to keep in mind that wants can be misleading. It always seems as if it’s the next delicious meal, career choice or relationship that will finally deliver, as Cain puts it, “the experience of ease and unfettered enjoyment” they falsely promise. In fact, there’s far more ease to be had “by understanding our wants, rather than scrambling to relieve them”. What you really want is to get proficient at questioning your wants.


Can’t always get what you want? Don’t worry

T he first time I went on a silent meditation retreat, a few years back, I was terrified the experience might prove impossible to endure. The last time I went, the other week, I faced a different problem: I was pretty sure it would be deeply enjoyable and refreshing. You might be wondering why that counts as a problem. Here’s why. It was on the evening of Day One, watching the sun sink below the horizon, savouring the stillness in the air, that a thought first occurred: “Damn it, only a few more days of this, and it’ll be time to leave!” According to a cheesy old saying, there are two ways to be unhappy. One is not getting what you want. The other is getting it. The trouble with happiness is that the prospect of it ending makes you sad.

I was in a good location to be entertaining such thoughts, since this insight is most commonly attributed to Buddhism, and meditation can help. But the same point crops up in multiple traditions: there’s more to “wanting” than meets the eye. You think the solution to wanting something is to obtain that thing, whereupon you’ll feel satisfied. But it rarely works out that way. Either the thing fails to live up to your expectations, or alternatively it does and then you’re desperate not to lose it. Worse, what you’re really sometimes craving isn’t the thing itself, but novelty – and by definition, you can’t keep obtaining that from the same person or possession. In a recent essay, Getting What We Want Isn’t What We Really Want, the blogger David Cain recalled the bittersweet experience of buying new CDs as a teenager: “Every glorious listen came with a faint streak of dread, because I knew I was only sucking the magic out of it with each play.”

Clearly, the problem here isn’t really with the specific things you want but don’t yet have. Rather, it’s something to do with the phenomenon of wanting itself. Recent work by the neuroscientists Jaak Panksepp and Robert Sapolsky suggests that the brain’s reward mechanisms are designed to give us squirts of dopamine not when we get what we want, but when we pursue it. We’re chemically rewarded for maintaining a state of unfulfilment. From an evolutionary angle, this isn’t a shock: constant restlessness is a better recipe for propagating your genes than contentment. And consumerism exacerbates the situation: the biggest profits come not from fully satisfying your customers, but from making sure they never stop seeking.

According to some hardcore Buddhists, the answer is to transcend desires entirely. A more immediately practical option is simply to keep in mind that wants can be misleading. It always seems as if it’s the next delicious meal, career choice or relationship that will finally deliver, as Cain puts it, “the experience of ease and unfettered enjoyment” they falsely promise. In fact, there’s far more ease to be had “by understanding our wants, rather than scrambling to relieve them”. What you really want is to get proficient at questioning your wants.


Can’t always get what you want? Don’t worry

T he first time I went on a silent meditation retreat, a few years back, I was terrified the experience might prove impossible to endure. The last time I went, the other week, I faced a different problem: I was pretty sure it would be deeply enjoyable and refreshing. You might be wondering why that counts as a problem. Here’s why. It was on the evening of Day One, watching the sun sink below the horizon, savouring the stillness in the air, that a thought first occurred: “Damn it, only a few more days of this, and it’ll be time to leave!” According to a cheesy old saying, there are two ways to be unhappy. One is not getting what you want. The other is getting it. The trouble with happiness is that the prospect of it ending makes you sad.

I was in a good location to be entertaining such thoughts, since this insight is most commonly attributed to Buddhism, and meditation can help. But the same point crops up in multiple traditions: there’s more to “wanting” than meets the eye. You think the solution to wanting something is to obtain that thing, whereupon you’ll feel satisfied. But it rarely works out that way. Either the thing fails to live up to your expectations, or alternatively it does and then you’re desperate not to lose it. Worse, what you’re really sometimes craving isn’t the thing itself, but novelty – and by definition, you can’t keep obtaining that from the same person or possession. In a recent essay, Getting What We Want Isn’t What We Really Want, the blogger David Cain recalled the bittersweet experience of buying new CDs as a teenager: “Every glorious listen came with a faint streak of dread, because I knew I was only sucking the magic out of it with each play.”

Clearly, the problem here isn’t really with the specific things you want but don’t yet have. Rather, it’s something to do with the phenomenon of wanting itself. Recent work by the neuroscientists Jaak Panksepp and Robert Sapolsky suggests that the brain’s reward mechanisms are designed to give us squirts of dopamine not when we get what we want, but when we pursue it. We’re chemically rewarded for maintaining a state of unfulfilment. From an evolutionary angle, this isn’t a shock: constant restlessness is a better recipe for propagating your genes than contentment. And consumerism exacerbates the situation: the biggest profits come not from fully satisfying your customers, but from making sure they never stop seeking.

According to some hardcore Buddhists, the answer is to transcend desires entirely. A more immediately practical option is simply to keep in mind that wants can be misleading. It always seems as if it’s the next delicious meal, career choice or relationship that will finally deliver, as Cain puts it, “the experience of ease and unfettered enjoyment” they falsely promise. In fact, there’s far more ease to be had “by understanding our wants, rather than scrambling to relieve them”. What you really want is to get proficient at questioning your wants.


Can’t always get what you want? Don’t worry

T he first time I went on a silent meditation retreat, a few years back, I was terrified the experience might prove impossible to endure. The last time I went, the other week, I faced a different problem: I was pretty sure it would be deeply enjoyable and refreshing. You might be wondering why that counts as a problem. Here’s why. It was on the evening of Day One, watching the sun sink below the horizon, savouring the stillness in the air, that a thought first occurred: “Damn it, only a few more days of this, and it’ll be time to leave!” According to a cheesy old saying, there are two ways to be unhappy. One is not getting what you want. The other is getting it. The trouble with happiness is that the prospect of it ending makes you sad.

I was in a good location to be entertaining such thoughts, since this insight is most commonly attributed to Buddhism, and meditation can help. But the same point crops up in multiple traditions: there’s more to “wanting” than meets the eye. You think the solution to wanting something is to obtain that thing, whereupon you’ll feel satisfied. But it rarely works out that way. Either the thing fails to live up to your expectations, or alternatively it does and then you’re desperate not to lose it. Worse, what you’re really sometimes craving isn’t the thing itself, but novelty – and by definition, you can’t keep obtaining that from the same person or possession. In a recent essay, Getting What We Want Isn’t What We Really Want, the blogger David Cain recalled the bittersweet experience of buying new CDs as a teenager: “Every glorious listen came with a faint streak of dread, because I knew I was only sucking the magic out of it with each play.”

Clearly, the problem here isn’t really with the specific things you want but don’t yet have. Rather, it’s something to do with the phenomenon of wanting itself. Recent work by the neuroscientists Jaak Panksepp and Robert Sapolsky suggests that the brain’s reward mechanisms are designed to give us squirts of dopamine not when we get what we want, but when we pursue it. We’re chemically rewarded for maintaining a state of unfulfilment. From an evolutionary angle, this isn’t a shock: constant restlessness is a better recipe for propagating your genes than contentment. And consumerism exacerbates the situation: the biggest profits come not from fully satisfying your customers, but from making sure they never stop seeking.

According to some hardcore Buddhists, the answer is to transcend desires entirely. A more immediately practical option is simply to keep in mind that wants can be misleading. It always seems as if it’s the next delicious meal, career choice or relationship that will finally deliver, as Cain puts it, “the experience of ease and unfettered enjoyment” they falsely promise. In fact, there’s far more ease to be had “by understanding our wants, rather than scrambling to relieve them”. What you really want is to get proficient at questioning your wants.


Can’t always get what you want? Don’t worry

T he first time I went on a silent meditation retreat, a few years back, I was terrified the experience might prove impossible to endure. The last time I went, the other week, I faced a different problem: I was pretty sure it would be deeply enjoyable and refreshing. You might be wondering why that counts as a problem. Here’s why. It was on the evening of Day One, watching the sun sink below the horizon, savouring the stillness in the air, that a thought first occurred: “Damn it, only a few more days of this, and it’ll be time to leave!” According to a cheesy old saying, there are two ways to be unhappy. One is not getting what you want. The other is getting it. The trouble with happiness is that the prospect of it ending makes you sad.

I was in a good location to be entertaining such thoughts, since this insight is most commonly attributed to Buddhism, and meditation can help. But the same point crops up in multiple traditions: there’s more to “wanting” than meets the eye. You think the solution to wanting something is to obtain that thing, whereupon you’ll feel satisfied. But it rarely works out that way. Either the thing fails to live up to your expectations, or alternatively it does and then you’re desperate not to lose it. Worse, what you’re really sometimes craving isn’t the thing itself, but novelty – and by definition, you can’t keep obtaining that from the same person or possession. In a recent essay, Getting What We Want Isn’t What We Really Want, the blogger David Cain recalled the bittersweet experience of buying new CDs as a teenager: “Every glorious listen came with a faint streak of dread, because I knew I was only sucking the magic out of it with each play.”

Clearly, the problem here isn’t really with the specific things you want but don’t yet have. Rather, it’s something to do with the phenomenon of wanting itself. Recent work by the neuroscientists Jaak Panksepp and Robert Sapolsky suggests that the brain’s reward mechanisms are designed to give us squirts of dopamine not when we get what we want, but when we pursue it. We’re chemically rewarded for maintaining a state of unfulfilment. From an evolutionary angle, this isn’t a shock: constant restlessness is a better recipe for propagating your genes than contentment. And consumerism exacerbates the situation: the biggest profits come not from fully satisfying your customers, but from making sure they never stop seeking.

According to some hardcore Buddhists, the answer is to transcend desires entirely. A more immediately practical option is simply to keep in mind that wants can be misleading. It always seems as if it’s the next delicious meal, career choice or relationship that will finally deliver, as Cain puts it, “the experience of ease and unfettered enjoyment” they falsely promise. In fact, there’s far more ease to be had “by understanding our wants, rather than scrambling to relieve them”. What you really want is to get proficient at questioning your wants.


Can’t always get what you want? Don’t worry

T he first time I went on a silent meditation retreat, a few years back, I was terrified the experience might prove impossible to endure. The last time I went, the other week, I faced a different problem: I was pretty sure it would be deeply enjoyable and refreshing. You might be wondering why that counts as a problem. Here’s why. It was on the evening of Day One, watching the sun sink below the horizon, savouring the stillness in the air, that a thought first occurred: “Damn it, only a few more days of this, and it’ll be time to leave!” According to a cheesy old saying, there are two ways to be unhappy. One is not getting what you want. The other is getting it. The trouble with happiness is that the prospect of it ending makes you sad.

I was in a good location to be entertaining such thoughts, since this insight is most commonly attributed to Buddhism, and meditation can help. But the same point crops up in multiple traditions: there’s more to “wanting” than meets the eye. You think the solution to wanting something is to obtain that thing, whereupon you’ll feel satisfied. But it rarely works out that way. Either the thing fails to live up to your expectations, or alternatively it does and then you’re desperate not to lose it. Worse, what you’re really sometimes craving isn’t the thing itself, but novelty – and by definition, you can’t keep obtaining that from the same person or possession. In a recent essay, Getting What We Want Isn’t What We Really Want, the blogger David Cain recalled the bittersweet experience of buying new CDs as a teenager: “Every glorious listen came with a faint streak of dread, because I knew I was only sucking the magic out of it with each play.”

Clearly, the problem here isn’t really with the specific things you want but don’t yet have. Rather, it’s something to do with the phenomenon of wanting itself. Recent work by the neuroscientists Jaak Panksepp and Robert Sapolsky suggests that the brain’s reward mechanisms are designed to give us squirts of dopamine not when we get what we want, but when we pursue it. We’re chemically rewarded for maintaining a state of unfulfilment. From an evolutionary angle, this isn’t a shock: constant restlessness is a better recipe for propagating your genes than contentment. And consumerism exacerbates the situation: the biggest profits come not from fully satisfying your customers, but from making sure they never stop seeking.

According to some hardcore Buddhists, the answer is to transcend desires entirely. A more immediately practical option is simply to keep in mind that wants can be misleading. It always seems as if it’s the next delicious meal, career choice or relationship that will finally deliver, as Cain puts it, “the experience of ease and unfettered enjoyment” they falsely promise. In fact, there’s far more ease to be had “by understanding our wants, rather than scrambling to relieve them”. What you really want is to get proficient at questioning your wants.


Can’t always get what you want? Don’t worry

T he first time I went on a silent meditation retreat, a few years back, I was terrified the experience might prove impossible to endure. The last time I went, the other week, I faced a different problem: I was pretty sure it would be deeply enjoyable and refreshing. You might be wondering why that counts as a problem. Here’s why. It was on the evening of Day One, watching the sun sink below the horizon, savouring the stillness in the air, that a thought first occurred: “Damn it, only a few more days of this, and it’ll be time to leave!” According to a cheesy old saying, there are two ways to be unhappy. One is not getting what you want. The other is getting it. The trouble with happiness is that the prospect of it ending makes you sad.

I was in a good location to be entertaining such thoughts, since this insight is most commonly attributed to Buddhism, and meditation can help. But the same point crops up in multiple traditions: there’s more to “wanting” than meets the eye. You think the solution to wanting something is to obtain that thing, whereupon you’ll feel satisfied. But it rarely works out that way. Either the thing fails to live up to your expectations, or alternatively it does and then you’re desperate not to lose it. Worse, what you’re really sometimes craving isn’t the thing itself, but novelty – and by definition, you can’t keep obtaining that from the same person or possession. In a recent essay, Getting What We Want Isn’t What We Really Want, the blogger David Cain recalled the bittersweet experience of buying new CDs as a teenager: “Every glorious listen came with a faint streak of dread, because I knew I was only sucking the magic out of it with each play.”

Clearly, the problem here isn’t really with the specific things you want but don’t yet have. Rather, it’s something to do with the phenomenon of wanting itself. Recent work by the neuroscientists Jaak Panksepp and Robert Sapolsky suggests that the brain’s reward mechanisms are designed to give us squirts of dopamine not when we get what we want, but when we pursue it. We’re chemically rewarded for maintaining a state of unfulfilment. From an evolutionary angle, this isn’t a shock: constant restlessness is a better recipe for propagating your genes than contentment. And consumerism exacerbates the situation: the biggest profits come not from fully satisfying your customers, but from making sure they never stop seeking.

According to some hardcore Buddhists, the answer is to transcend desires entirely. A more immediately practical option is simply to keep in mind that wants can be misleading. It always seems as if it’s the next delicious meal, career choice or relationship that will finally deliver, as Cain puts it, “the experience of ease and unfettered enjoyment” they falsely promise. In fact, there’s far more ease to be had “by understanding our wants, rather than scrambling to relieve them”. What you really want is to get proficient at questioning your wants.


Can’t always get what you want? Don’t worry

T he first time I went on a silent meditation retreat, a few years back, I was terrified the experience might prove impossible to endure. The last time I went, the other week, I faced a different problem: I was pretty sure it would be deeply enjoyable and refreshing. You might be wondering why that counts as a problem. Here’s why. It was on the evening of Day One, watching the sun sink below the horizon, savouring the stillness in the air, that a thought first occurred: “Damn it, only a few more days of this, and it’ll be time to leave!” According to a cheesy old saying, there are two ways to be unhappy. One is not getting what you want. The other is getting it. The trouble with happiness is that the prospect of it ending makes you sad.

I was in a good location to be entertaining such thoughts, since this insight is most commonly attributed to Buddhism, and meditation can help. But the same point crops up in multiple traditions: there’s more to “wanting” than meets the eye. You think the solution to wanting something is to obtain that thing, whereupon you’ll feel satisfied. But it rarely works out that way. Either the thing fails to live up to your expectations, or alternatively it does and then you’re desperate not to lose it. Worse, what you’re really sometimes craving isn’t the thing itself, but novelty – and by definition, you can’t keep obtaining that from the same person or possession. In a recent essay, Getting What We Want Isn’t What We Really Want, the blogger David Cain recalled the bittersweet experience of buying new CDs as a teenager: “Every glorious listen came with a faint streak of dread, because I knew I was only sucking the magic out of it with each play.”

Clearly, the problem here isn’t really with the specific things you want but don’t yet have. Rather, it’s something to do with the phenomenon of wanting itself. Recent work by the neuroscientists Jaak Panksepp and Robert Sapolsky suggests that the brain’s reward mechanisms are designed to give us squirts of dopamine not when we get what we want, but when we pursue it. We’re chemically rewarded for maintaining a state of unfulfilment. From an evolutionary angle, this isn’t a shock: constant restlessness is a better recipe for propagating your genes than contentment. And consumerism exacerbates the situation: the biggest profits come not from fully satisfying your customers, but from making sure they never stop seeking.

According to some hardcore Buddhists, the answer is to transcend desires entirely. A more immediately practical option is simply to keep in mind that wants can be misleading. It always seems as if it’s the next delicious meal, career choice or relationship that will finally deliver, as Cain puts it, “the experience of ease and unfettered enjoyment” they falsely promise. In fact, there’s far more ease to be had “by understanding our wants, rather than scrambling to relieve them”. What you really want is to get proficient at questioning your wants.


Watch the video: The Rolling Stones - You Cant Always Get What You Want Official Video 4K (July 2022).


Comments:

  1. Choviohoya

    Certainly, certainly.

  2. Greguska

    It is a pity, that now I can not express - it is compelled to leave. I will be released - I will necessarily express the opinion.

  3. Jayvee

    Good !!! Let's wait for the best quality

  4. Zulugrel

    Correct answer

  5. Sewald

    We will speak to this topic.



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