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What are We Throwing Away?

What are We Throwing Away?


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Photo by Peter Yu

1. Milk: The cautionary tale of the impending expiration date: milk spoils (along with our happiness) when we realize we can no longer eat cereal that morning. This tragic occurrence plagues common households across the country in fridges everywhere. So many cartons of milk, along with dairy by-products such as cheese, are wasted annually simply because they are not consumed before the blood-curdling scream is heard upon smelling curdled milk.

Photo by Peter Yu

2. Potatoes: With potatoes come French fries and with French fries come the sad, noodle-y and hastily overlooked leftovers at the bottom of the fast food bag. When you crumble up your bag to make the three-point in the garbage can next time, just remember the poor baglers that are going to waste.

3. Soft Drinks: From the strategic game of dodging potholes on the road in your car to the classic accidental elbow at the movie theater, the possibilities of spilling your drink are endless. Not only that, but when the fizz begins to wane and only a few bubbles of carbonation linger as a vestige of the former flavor, many people throw out their still-full sodas when they merely taste too flat.

4. Apples: The apple doesn’t fall far from the tree; but it does fall, along with many others, to rot on the ground.

Photo by Peter Yu

5. Bread: The curious case of the complimentary bread. Your insatiable hunger is urging you to take a piece (or two) set on the table at the restaurant in a tempting manner, yet your mom is telling you to wait for your meal. This inevitability leads to a surplus of bread still blanketed in the basket, wafting scents of garlic or cheese at the end of the meal when everyone is too full to consider the carbs left abandoned on the table. This bread often gets thrown out only to waste away its days being picked out of the trash cans by squirrels.

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View the original post, What are We Throwing Away?, on Spoon University.

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4 Moldy Foods You Can Eat (Plus Which Foods to Toss)

According to the USDA, some foods can be used even when they're moldy, while others need to be discarded. Find out which foods make the list.

Americans throw away about 90 billion pounds of food every year (yikes!). No one likes trashing their food-and money-but if something in your fridge is starting to turn, how do you know whether it&aposs safe to eat it? If you see mold growing on food in your fridge, do you automatically need to throw it out?

Not always, according to the USDA. Some foods can be used even when they&aposre moldy, while others need to be discarded.

4 moldy foods you can eat

However, if any of these are completely covered with mold, throw them away.

1. Hard salami and dry-cured country hams

Apparently it&aposs normal for these products to have a surface mold. The USDA&aposs advice is to just scrub the mold off the surface and then use.

2. Hard cheese made without mold

For cheeses where mold isn&apost part of the processing, mold generally can&apost get deep into the product. For hard cheeses, such as Asiago, Pecorino, Parmesan and Cheddar, lop off at least 1 inch around and below the mold spot (to avoid cross-contamination, be careful not to touch the mold with the knife).

3. Hard cheese made with mold

If these cheeses, such as Gorgonzola and Stilton, have a surface mold on them, you can use them if you cut off at least 1 inch around and below the mold spot.

4. Firm fruits and vegetables.

The key word here is firm (think: cabbage, bell peppers, carrots, etc.). Like the hard cheeses made without mold, dense fruits and vegetables are not easily penetrated by mold. The same rule of thumb applies to firm produce: cut off at least an inch around and below the mold spot (again, not touching the mold with your knife) before using.

Foods you should toss if they're moldy

These foods have a high moisture content and so may be contaminated with mold-which have difficult-to-see, thin, threadlike branches and roots-below the surface.

Cheeses that are made with mold-and aren&apost hard-such as Brie, Camembert and some blue cheeses, should be discarded. Soft cheeses, such as cottage and cream cheese, Neufchatel, chevre, etc., should also be thrown away. Also ditch all types of crumbled, shredded or sliced cheeses.

According to the USDA, the mold in jams and jellies could produce a mycotoxin (a poisonous substance that can make you sick) and so should be discarded.

4. Soft fruits and vegetables

Like yogurt and sour cream, soft fruits and vegetables (cucumbers, tomatoes, peaches, berries, etc.) may have mold growing below the surface. Also, because mold spreads quickly in fruits and vegetables, check nearby foods in your produce drawer.

These are porous foods, so mold may also be growing below the surface.

6. Peanut butter, legumes and nuts

Because these are processed without preservatives, they&aposre at high risk for mold, according to the USDA.

7. Luncheon meats, bacon or hot dogs

If these items, which are moisture-rich, like yogurt, sour cream and produce, have mold on them, they should be discarded as the mold may also be below the surface.

The USDA advises that you discard cooked leftover meat and poultry, cooked casseroles and cooked grain and pasta that are moldy. They all have high moisture content and, thus, may be contaminated with mold below the surface.


4 Moldy Foods You Can Eat (Plus Which Foods to Toss)

According to the USDA, some foods can be used even when they're moldy, while others need to be discarded. Find out which foods make the list.

Americans throw away about 90 billion pounds of food every year (yikes!). No one likes trashing their food-and money-but if something in your fridge is starting to turn, how do you know whether it&aposs safe to eat it? If you see mold growing on food in your fridge, do you automatically need to throw it out?

Not always, according to the USDA. Some foods can be used even when they&aposre moldy, while others need to be discarded.

4 moldy foods you can eat

However, if any of these are completely covered with mold, throw them away.

1. Hard salami and dry-cured country hams

Apparently it&aposs normal for these products to have a surface mold. The USDA&aposs advice is to just scrub the mold off the surface and then use.

2. Hard cheese made without mold

For cheeses where mold isn&apost part of the processing, mold generally can&apost get deep into the product. For hard cheeses, such as Asiago, Pecorino, Parmesan and Cheddar, lop off at least 1 inch around and below the mold spot (to avoid cross-contamination, be careful not to touch the mold with the knife).

3. Hard cheese made with mold

If these cheeses, such as Gorgonzola and Stilton, have a surface mold on them, you can use them if you cut off at least 1 inch around and below the mold spot.

4. Firm fruits and vegetables.

The key word here is firm (think: cabbage, bell peppers, carrots, etc.). Like the hard cheeses made without mold, dense fruits and vegetables are not easily penetrated by mold. The same rule of thumb applies to firm produce: cut off at least an inch around and below the mold spot (again, not touching the mold with your knife) before using.

Foods you should toss if they're moldy

These foods have a high moisture content and so may be contaminated with mold-which have difficult-to-see, thin, threadlike branches and roots-below the surface.

Cheeses that are made with mold-and aren&apost hard-such as Brie, Camembert and some blue cheeses, should be discarded. Soft cheeses, such as cottage and cream cheese, Neufchatel, chevre, etc., should also be thrown away. Also ditch all types of crumbled, shredded or sliced cheeses.

According to the USDA, the mold in jams and jellies could produce a mycotoxin (a poisonous substance that can make you sick) and so should be discarded.

4. Soft fruits and vegetables

Like yogurt and sour cream, soft fruits and vegetables (cucumbers, tomatoes, peaches, berries, etc.) may have mold growing below the surface. Also, because mold spreads quickly in fruits and vegetables, check nearby foods in your produce drawer.

These are porous foods, so mold may also be growing below the surface.

6. Peanut butter, legumes and nuts

Because these are processed without preservatives, they&aposre at high risk for mold, according to the USDA.

7. Luncheon meats, bacon or hot dogs

If these items, which are moisture-rich, like yogurt, sour cream and produce, have mold on them, they should be discarded as the mold may also be below the surface.

The USDA advises that you discard cooked leftover meat and poultry, cooked casseroles and cooked grain and pasta that are moldy. They all have high moisture content and, thus, may be contaminated with mold below the surface.


4 Moldy Foods You Can Eat (Plus Which Foods to Toss)

According to the USDA, some foods can be used even when they're moldy, while others need to be discarded. Find out which foods make the list.

Americans throw away about 90 billion pounds of food every year (yikes!). No one likes trashing their food-and money-but if something in your fridge is starting to turn, how do you know whether it&aposs safe to eat it? If you see mold growing on food in your fridge, do you automatically need to throw it out?

Not always, according to the USDA. Some foods can be used even when they&aposre moldy, while others need to be discarded.

4 moldy foods you can eat

However, if any of these are completely covered with mold, throw them away.

1. Hard salami and dry-cured country hams

Apparently it&aposs normal for these products to have a surface mold. The USDA&aposs advice is to just scrub the mold off the surface and then use.

2. Hard cheese made without mold

For cheeses where mold isn&apost part of the processing, mold generally can&apost get deep into the product. For hard cheeses, such as Asiago, Pecorino, Parmesan and Cheddar, lop off at least 1 inch around and below the mold spot (to avoid cross-contamination, be careful not to touch the mold with the knife).

3. Hard cheese made with mold

If these cheeses, such as Gorgonzola and Stilton, have a surface mold on them, you can use them if you cut off at least 1 inch around and below the mold spot.

4. Firm fruits and vegetables.

The key word here is firm (think: cabbage, bell peppers, carrots, etc.). Like the hard cheeses made without mold, dense fruits and vegetables are not easily penetrated by mold. The same rule of thumb applies to firm produce: cut off at least an inch around and below the mold spot (again, not touching the mold with your knife) before using.

Foods you should toss if they're moldy

These foods have a high moisture content and so may be contaminated with mold-which have difficult-to-see, thin, threadlike branches and roots-below the surface.

Cheeses that are made with mold-and aren&apost hard-such as Brie, Camembert and some blue cheeses, should be discarded. Soft cheeses, such as cottage and cream cheese, Neufchatel, chevre, etc., should also be thrown away. Also ditch all types of crumbled, shredded or sliced cheeses.

According to the USDA, the mold in jams and jellies could produce a mycotoxin (a poisonous substance that can make you sick) and so should be discarded.

4. Soft fruits and vegetables

Like yogurt and sour cream, soft fruits and vegetables (cucumbers, tomatoes, peaches, berries, etc.) may have mold growing below the surface. Also, because mold spreads quickly in fruits and vegetables, check nearby foods in your produce drawer.

These are porous foods, so mold may also be growing below the surface.

6. Peanut butter, legumes and nuts

Because these are processed without preservatives, they&aposre at high risk for mold, according to the USDA.

7. Luncheon meats, bacon or hot dogs

If these items, which are moisture-rich, like yogurt, sour cream and produce, have mold on them, they should be discarded as the mold may also be below the surface.

The USDA advises that you discard cooked leftover meat and poultry, cooked casseroles and cooked grain and pasta that are moldy. They all have high moisture content and, thus, may be contaminated with mold below the surface.


4 Moldy Foods You Can Eat (Plus Which Foods to Toss)

According to the USDA, some foods can be used even when they're moldy, while others need to be discarded. Find out which foods make the list.

Americans throw away about 90 billion pounds of food every year (yikes!). No one likes trashing their food-and money-but if something in your fridge is starting to turn, how do you know whether it&aposs safe to eat it? If you see mold growing on food in your fridge, do you automatically need to throw it out?

Not always, according to the USDA. Some foods can be used even when they&aposre moldy, while others need to be discarded.

4 moldy foods you can eat

However, if any of these are completely covered with mold, throw them away.

1. Hard salami and dry-cured country hams

Apparently it&aposs normal for these products to have a surface mold. The USDA&aposs advice is to just scrub the mold off the surface and then use.

2. Hard cheese made without mold

For cheeses where mold isn&apost part of the processing, mold generally can&apost get deep into the product. For hard cheeses, such as Asiago, Pecorino, Parmesan and Cheddar, lop off at least 1 inch around and below the mold spot (to avoid cross-contamination, be careful not to touch the mold with the knife).

3. Hard cheese made with mold

If these cheeses, such as Gorgonzola and Stilton, have a surface mold on them, you can use them if you cut off at least 1 inch around and below the mold spot.

4. Firm fruits and vegetables.

The key word here is firm (think: cabbage, bell peppers, carrots, etc.). Like the hard cheeses made without mold, dense fruits and vegetables are not easily penetrated by mold. The same rule of thumb applies to firm produce: cut off at least an inch around and below the mold spot (again, not touching the mold with your knife) before using.

Foods you should toss if they're moldy

These foods have a high moisture content and so may be contaminated with mold-which have difficult-to-see, thin, threadlike branches and roots-below the surface.

Cheeses that are made with mold-and aren&apost hard-such as Brie, Camembert and some blue cheeses, should be discarded. Soft cheeses, such as cottage and cream cheese, Neufchatel, chevre, etc., should also be thrown away. Also ditch all types of crumbled, shredded or sliced cheeses.

According to the USDA, the mold in jams and jellies could produce a mycotoxin (a poisonous substance that can make you sick) and so should be discarded.

4. Soft fruits and vegetables

Like yogurt and sour cream, soft fruits and vegetables (cucumbers, tomatoes, peaches, berries, etc.) may have mold growing below the surface. Also, because mold spreads quickly in fruits and vegetables, check nearby foods in your produce drawer.

These are porous foods, so mold may also be growing below the surface.

6. Peanut butter, legumes and nuts

Because these are processed without preservatives, they&aposre at high risk for mold, according to the USDA.

7. Luncheon meats, bacon or hot dogs

If these items, which are moisture-rich, like yogurt, sour cream and produce, have mold on them, they should be discarded as the mold may also be below the surface.

The USDA advises that you discard cooked leftover meat and poultry, cooked casseroles and cooked grain and pasta that are moldy. They all have high moisture content and, thus, may be contaminated with mold below the surface.


4 Moldy Foods You Can Eat (Plus Which Foods to Toss)

According to the USDA, some foods can be used even when they're moldy, while others need to be discarded. Find out which foods make the list.

Americans throw away about 90 billion pounds of food every year (yikes!). No one likes trashing their food-and money-but if something in your fridge is starting to turn, how do you know whether it&aposs safe to eat it? If you see mold growing on food in your fridge, do you automatically need to throw it out?

Not always, according to the USDA. Some foods can be used even when they&aposre moldy, while others need to be discarded.

4 moldy foods you can eat

However, if any of these are completely covered with mold, throw them away.

1. Hard salami and dry-cured country hams

Apparently it&aposs normal for these products to have a surface mold. The USDA&aposs advice is to just scrub the mold off the surface and then use.

2. Hard cheese made without mold

For cheeses where mold isn&apost part of the processing, mold generally can&apost get deep into the product. For hard cheeses, such as Asiago, Pecorino, Parmesan and Cheddar, lop off at least 1 inch around and below the mold spot (to avoid cross-contamination, be careful not to touch the mold with the knife).

3. Hard cheese made with mold

If these cheeses, such as Gorgonzola and Stilton, have a surface mold on them, you can use them if you cut off at least 1 inch around and below the mold spot.

4. Firm fruits and vegetables.

The key word here is firm (think: cabbage, bell peppers, carrots, etc.). Like the hard cheeses made without mold, dense fruits and vegetables are not easily penetrated by mold. The same rule of thumb applies to firm produce: cut off at least an inch around and below the mold spot (again, not touching the mold with your knife) before using.

Foods you should toss if they're moldy

These foods have a high moisture content and so may be contaminated with mold-which have difficult-to-see, thin, threadlike branches and roots-below the surface.

Cheeses that are made with mold-and aren&apost hard-such as Brie, Camembert and some blue cheeses, should be discarded. Soft cheeses, such as cottage and cream cheese, Neufchatel, chevre, etc., should also be thrown away. Also ditch all types of crumbled, shredded or sliced cheeses.

According to the USDA, the mold in jams and jellies could produce a mycotoxin (a poisonous substance that can make you sick) and so should be discarded.

4. Soft fruits and vegetables

Like yogurt and sour cream, soft fruits and vegetables (cucumbers, tomatoes, peaches, berries, etc.) may have mold growing below the surface. Also, because mold spreads quickly in fruits and vegetables, check nearby foods in your produce drawer.

These are porous foods, so mold may also be growing below the surface.

6. Peanut butter, legumes and nuts

Because these are processed without preservatives, they&aposre at high risk for mold, according to the USDA.

7. Luncheon meats, bacon or hot dogs

If these items, which are moisture-rich, like yogurt, sour cream and produce, have mold on them, they should be discarded as the mold may also be below the surface.

The USDA advises that you discard cooked leftover meat and poultry, cooked casseroles and cooked grain and pasta that are moldy. They all have high moisture content and, thus, may be contaminated with mold below the surface.


4 Moldy Foods You Can Eat (Plus Which Foods to Toss)

According to the USDA, some foods can be used even when they're moldy, while others need to be discarded. Find out which foods make the list.

Americans throw away about 90 billion pounds of food every year (yikes!). No one likes trashing their food-and money-but if something in your fridge is starting to turn, how do you know whether it&aposs safe to eat it? If you see mold growing on food in your fridge, do you automatically need to throw it out?

Not always, according to the USDA. Some foods can be used even when they&aposre moldy, while others need to be discarded.

4 moldy foods you can eat

However, if any of these are completely covered with mold, throw them away.

1. Hard salami and dry-cured country hams

Apparently it&aposs normal for these products to have a surface mold. The USDA&aposs advice is to just scrub the mold off the surface and then use.

2. Hard cheese made without mold

For cheeses where mold isn&apost part of the processing, mold generally can&apost get deep into the product. For hard cheeses, such as Asiago, Pecorino, Parmesan and Cheddar, lop off at least 1 inch around and below the mold spot (to avoid cross-contamination, be careful not to touch the mold with the knife).

3. Hard cheese made with mold

If these cheeses, such as Gorgonzola and Stilton, have a surface mold on them, you can use them if you cut off at least 1 inch around and below the mold spot.

4. Firm fruits and vegetables.

The key word here is firm (think: cabbage, bell peppers, carrots, etc.). Like the hard cheeses made without mold, dense fruits and vegetables are not easily penetrated by mold. The same rule of thumb applies to firm produce: cut off at least an inch around and below the mold spot (again, not touching the mold with your knife) before using.

Foods you should toss if they're moldy

These foods have a high moisture content and so may be contaminated with mold-which have difficult-to-see, thin, threadlike branches and roots-below the surface.

Cheeses that are made with mold-and aren&apost hard-such as Brie, Camembert and some blue cheeses, should be discarded. Soft cheeses, such as cottage and cream cheese, Neufchatel, chevre, etc., should also be thrown away. Also ditch all types of crumbled, shredded or sliced cheeses.

According to the USDA, the mold in jams and jellies could produce a mycotoxin (a poisonous substance that can make you sick) and so should be discarded.

4. Soft fruits and vegetables

Like yogurt and sour cream, soft fruits and vegetables (cucumbers, tomatoes, peaches, berries, etc.) may have mold growing below the surface. Also, because mold spreads quickly in fruits and vegetables, check nearby foods in your produce drawer.

These are porous foods, so mold may also be growing below the surface.

6. Peanut butter, legumes and nuts

Because these are processed without preservatives, they&aposre at high risk for mold, according to the USDA.

7. Luncheon meats, bacon or hot dogs

If these items, which are moisture-rich, like yogurt, sour cream and produce, have mold on them, they should be discarded as the mold may also be below the surface.

The USDA advises that you discard cooked leftover meat and poultry, cooked casseroles and cooked grain and pasta that are moldy. They all have high moisture content and, thus, may be contaminated with mold below the surface.


4 Moldy Foods You Can Eat (Plus Which Foods to Toss)

According to the USDA, some foods can be used even when they're moldy, while others need to be discarded. Find out which foods make the list.

Americans throw away about 90 billion pounds of food every year (yikes!). No one likes trashing their food-and money-but if something in your fridge is starting to turn, how do you know whether it&aposs safe to eat it? If you see mold growing on food in your fridge, do you automatically need to throw it out?

Not always, according to the USDA. Some foods can be used even when they&aposre moldy, while others need to be discarded.

4 moldy foods you can eat

However, if any of these are completely covered with mold, throw them away.

1. Hard salami and dry-cured country hams

Apparently it&aposs normal for these products to have a surface mold. The USDA&aposs advice is to just scrub the mold off the surface and then use.

2. Hard cheese made without mold

For cheeses where mold isn&apost part of the processing, mold generally can&apost get deep into the product. For hard cheeses, such as Asiago, Pecorino, Parmesan and Cheddar, lop off at least 1 inch around and below the mold spot (to avoid cross-contamination, be careful not to touch the mold with the knife).

3. Hard cheese made with mold

If these cheeses, such as Gorgonzola and Stilton, have a surface mold on them, you can use them if you cut off at least 1 inch around and below the mold spot.

4. Firm fruits and vegetables.

The key word here is firm (think: cabbage, bell peppers, carrots, etc.). Like the hard cheeses made without mold, dense fruits and vegetables are not easily penetrated by mold. The same rule of thumb applies to firm produce: cut off at least an inch around and below the mold spot (again, not touching the mold with your knife) before using.

Foods you should toss if they're moldy

These foods have a high moisture content and so may be contaminated with mold-which have difficult-to-see, thin, threadlike branches and roots-below the surface.

Cheeses that are made with mold-and aren&apost hard-such as Brie, Camembert and some blue cheeses, should be discarded. Soft cheeses, such as cottage and cream cheese, Neufchatel, chevre, etc., should also be thrown away. Also ditch all types of crumbled, shredded or sliced cheeses.

According to the USDA, the mold in jams and jellies could produce a mycotoxin (a poisonous substance that can make you sick) and so should be discarded.

4. Soft fruits and vegetables

Like yogurt and sour cream, soft fruits and vegetables (cucumbers, tomatoes, peaches, berries, etc.) may have mold growing below the surface. Also, because mold spreads quickly in fruits and vegetables, check nearby foods in your produce drawer.

These are porous foods, so mold may also be growing below the surface.

6. Peanut butter, legumes and nuts

Because these are processed without preservatives, they&aposre at high risk for mold, according to the USDA.

7. Luncheon meats, bacon or hot dogs

If these items, which are moisture-rich, like yogurt, sour cream and produce, have mold on them, they should be discarded as the mold may also be below the surface.

The USDA advises that you discard cooked leftover meat and poultry, cooked casseroles and cooked grain and pasta that are moldy. They all have high moisture content and, thus, may be contaminated with mold below the surface.


4 Moldy Foods You Can Eat (Plus Which Foods to Toss)

According to the USDA, some foods can be used even when they're moldy, while others need to be discarded. Find out which foods make the list.

Americans throw away about 90 billion pounds of food every year (yikes!). No one likes trashing their food-and money-but if something in your fridge is starting to turn, how do you know whether it&aposs safe to eat it? If you see mold growing on food in your fridge, do you automatically need to throw it out?

Not always, according to the USDA. Some foods can be used even when they&aposre moldy, while others need to be discarded.

4 moldy foods you can eat

However, if any of these are completely covered with mold, throw them away.

1. Hard salami and dry-cured country hams

Apparently it&aposs normal for these products to have a surface mold. The USDA&aposs advice is to just scrub the mold off the surface and then use.

2. Hard cheese made without mold

For cheeses where mold isn&apost part of the processing, mold generally can&apost get deep into the product. For hard cheeses, such as Asiago, Pecorino, Parmesan and Cheddar, lop off at least 1 inch around and below the mold spot (to avoid cross-contamination, be careful not to touch the mold with the knife).

3. Hard cheese made with mold

If these cheeses, such as Gorgonzola and Stilton, have a surface mold on them, you can use them if you cut off at least 1 inch around and below the mold spot.

4. Firm fruits and vegetables.

The key word here is firm (think: cabbage, bell peppers, carrots, etc.). Like the hard cheeses made without mold, dense fruits and vegetables are not easily penetrated by mold. The same rule of thumb applies to firm produce: cut off at least an inch around and below the mold spot (again, not touching the mold with your knife) before using.

Foods you should toss if they're moldy

These foods have a high moisture content and so may be contaminated with mold-which have difficult-to-see, thin, threadlike branches and roots-below the surface.

Cheeses that are made with mold-and aren&apost hard-such as Brie, Camembert and some blue cheeses, should be discarded. Soft cheeses, such as cottage and cream cheese, Neufchatel, chevre, etc., should also be thrown away. Also ditch all types of crumbled, shredded or sliced cheeses.

According to the USDA, the mold in jams and jellies could produce a mycotoxin (a poisonous substance that can make you sick) and so should be discarded.

4. Soft fruits and vegetables

Like yogurt and sour cream, soft fruits and vegetables (cucumbers, tomatoes, peaches, berries, etc.) may have mold growing below the surface. Also, because mold spreads quickly in fruits and vegetables, check nearby foods in your produce drawer.

These are porous foods, so mold may also be growing below the surface.

6. Peanut butter, legumes and nuts

Because these are processed without preservatives, they&aposre at high risk for mold, according to the USDA.

7. Luncheon meats, bacon or hot dogs

If these items, which are moisture-rich, like yogurt, sour cream and produce, have mold on them, they should be discarded as the mold may also be below the surface.

The USDA advises that you discard cooked leftover meat and poultry, cooked casseroles and cooked grain and pasta that are moldy. They all have high moisture content and, thus, may be contaminated with mold below the surface.


4 Moldy Foods You Can Eat (Plus Which Foods to Toss)

According to the USDA, some foods can be used even when they're moldy, while others need to be discarded. Find out which foods make the list.

Americans throw away about 90 billion pounds of food every year (yikes!). No one likes trashing their food-and money-but if something in your fridge is starting to turn, how do you know whether it&aposs safe to eat it? If you see mold growing on food in your fridge, do you automatically need to throw it out?

Not always, according to the USDA. Some foods can be used even when they&aposre moldy, while others need to be discarded.

4 moldy foods you can eat

However, if any of these are completely covered with mold, throw them away.

1. Hard salami and dry-cured country hams

Apparently it&aposs normal for these products to have a surface mold. The USDA&aposs advice is to just scrub the mold off the surface and then use.

2. Hard cheese made without mold

For cheeses where mold isn&apost part of the processing, mold generally can&apost get deep into the product. For hard cheeses, such as Asiago, Pecorino, Parmesan and Cheddar, lop off at least 1 inch around and below the mold spot (to avoid cross-contamination, be careful not to touch the mold with the knife).

3. Hard cheese made with mold

If these cheeses, such as Gorgonzola and Stilton, have a surface mold on them, you can use them if you cut off at least 1 inch around and below the mold spot.

4. Firm fruits and vegetables.

The key word here is firm (think: cabbage, bell peppers, carrots, etc.). Like the hard cheeses made without mold, dense fruits and vegetables are not easily penetrated by mold. The same rule of thumb applies to firm produce: cut off at least an inch around and below the mold spot (again, not touching the mold with your knife) before using.

Foods you should toss if they're moldy

These foods have a high moisture content and so may be contaminated with mold-which have difficult-to-see, thin, threadlike branches and roots-below the surface.

Cheeses that are made with mold-and aren&apost hard-such as Brie, Camembert and some blue cheeses, should be discarded. Soft cheeses, such as cottage and cream cheese, Neufchatel, chevre, etc., should also be thrown away. Also ditch all types of crumbled, shredded or sliced cheeses.

According to the USDA, the mold in jams and jellies could produce a mycotoxin (a poisonous substance that can make you sick) and so should be discarded.

4. Soft fruits and vegetables

Like yogurt and sour cream, soft fruits and vegetables (cucumbers, tomatoes, peaches, berries, etc.) may have mold growing below the surface. Also, because mold spreads quickly in fruits and vegetables, check nearby foods in your produce drawer.

These are porous foods, so mold may also be growing below the surface.

6. Peanut butter, legumes and nuts

Because these are processed without preservatives, they&aposre at high risk for mold, according to the USDA.

7. Luncheon meats, bacon or hot dogs

If these items, which are moisture-rich, like yogurt, sour cream and produce, have mold on them, they should be discarded as the mold may also be below the surface.

The USDA advises that you discard cooked leftover meat and poultry, cooked casseroles and cooked grain and pasta that are moldy. They all have high moisture content and, thus, may be contaminated with mold below the surface.


4 Moldy Foods You Can Eat (Plus Which Foods to Toss)

According to the USDA, some foods can be used even when they're moldy, while others need to be discarded. Find out which foods make the list.

Americans throw away about 90 billion pounds of food every year (yikes!). No one likes trashing their food-and money-but if something in your fridge is starting to turn, how do you know whether it&aposs safe to eat it? If you see mold growing on food in your fridge, do you automatically need to throw it out?

Not always, according to the USDA. Some foods can be used even when they&aposre moldy, while others need to be discarded.

4 moldy foods you can eat

However, if any of these are completely covered with mold, throw them away.

1. Hard salami and dry-cured country hams

Apparently it&aposs normal for these products to have a surface mold. The USDA&aposs advice is to just scrub the mold off the surface and then use.

2. Hard cheese made without mold

For cheeses where mold isn&apost part of the processing, mold generally can&apost get deep into the product. For hard cheeses, such as Asiago, Pecorino, Parmesan and Cheddar, lop off at least 1 inch around and below the mold spot (to avoid cross-contamination, be careful not to touch the mold with the knife).

3. Hard cheese made with mold

If these cheeses, such as Gorgonzola and Stilton, have a surface mold on them, you can use them if you cut off at least 1 inch around and below the mold spot.

4. Firm fruits and vegetables.

The key word here is firm (think: cabbage, bell peppers, carrots, etc.). Like the hard cheeses made without mold, dense fruits and vegetables are not easily penetrated by mold. The same rule of thumb applies to firm produce: cut off at least an inch around and below the mold spot (again, not touching the mold with your knife) before using.

Foods you should toss if they're moldy

These foods have a high moisture content and so may be contaminated with mold-which have difficult-to-see, thin, threadlike branches and roots-below the surface.

Cheeses that are made with mold-and aren&apost hard-such as Brie, Camembert and some blue cheeses, should be discarded. Soft cheeses, such as cottage and cream cheese, Neufchatel, chevre, etc., should also be thrown away. Also ditch all types of crumbled, shredded or sliced cheeses.

According to the USDA, the mold in jams and jellies could produce a mycotoxin (a poisonous substance that can make you sick) and so should be discarded.

4. Soft fruits and vegetables

Like yogurt and sour cream, soft fruits and vegetables (cucumbers, tomatoes, peaches, berries, etc.) may have mold growing below the surface. Also, because mold spreads quickly in fruits and vegetables, check nearby foods in your produce drawer.

These are porous foods, so mold may also be growing below the surface.

6. Peanut butter, legumes and nuts

Because these are processed without preservatives, they&aposre at high risk for mold, according to the USDA.

7. Luncheon meats, bacon or hot dogs

If these items, which are moisture-rich, like yogurt, sour cream and produce, have mold on them, they should be discarded as the mold may also be below the surface.

The USDA advises that you discard cooked leftover meat and poultry, cooked casseroles and cooked grain and pasta that are moldy. They all have high moisture content and, thus, may be contaminated with mold below the surface.


Watch the video: Why Are We Throwing Away Perfectly Edible Food? Food, Wasted 13 (May 2022).